Thursday, June 7, 2012

WINGS

One photo prompt is worth a hundred words. Here's my story for this week's Friday Fictioneers. Thanks Madison Woods.


When my mother was pregnant in 1958 she took an experimental drug to quell morning sickness. Seven months later she delivered a daughter with limbs too small to ever be useful.

Leslie never complained about her deformities. Instead she made jokes about them and dreamed of flying.

Once we took a hot-air balloon ride. She tossed sequins over the side. They glittered to the water below.

“In my next life,” she said, “I want to be a bird.”

From the same balloon I pour out her ashes. Mixed with sequins they spangle the sky.

Today my sister is free!

40 comments:

  1. Amazing!!! Very, very touching! Thank you for commenting on mine: http://theforgottenwife.com/2012/06/07/friday-fictioneers-6812/

    ReplyDelete
  2. That is absolutely beautiful! Love the sequins!

    ReplyDelete
  3. A beautiful story. Just a minor nitpick. The picture isn't of a hot air balloon; rather, an airship, and I only nitpick because I'm a pilot. Sorry.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wondered why it looked so lumpy. I assumed it was just an oddly shaped hot air balloon. It certainly is hard to see on my tiny screen.

      Delete
    2. And I thought it was the Goodyear blimp. Of course I intentionally ignored the fact and went with hot air balloon.

      Delete
  4. This is a beautiful story Rochelle :)

    Here's mine: http://writersclubkl.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/friday-fictioneer-spread-your-wings-and-fly/

    ReplyDelete
  5. A very moving way to ascribe a painful, probably very regrettable mistake on the mother's part, but a beautiful way for the sister to honor her request and memory. Nicely done.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Beautiful!! Such emotion in a bittersweet tale--loved the touch of sequins mixed with ashes. Such freedom!!

    Thanks for reading mine. For others: http://www.vlgregory-circa1800.vpweb.com/blog.html

    ReplyDelete
  7. Beautiful, touching and heartbreaking. You outdid yourself once again, Rochelle. I will be posting mine in a few minutes...you know where to find me...
    www.triplemoonstar.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  8. What a lovely story! Great start to the weekend, Check out mine: http://remakingme-atiyatownes.blogspot.com/2012/06/friday-fictioneer-jump.html I hope you like mine as much as I did yours

    ReplyDelete
  9. Beautiful and touching story. Somehow I believe it to be a true story. Well done. Thanks for the comment. Mine is here for others: http://readinpleasure.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/fridayfictioneers-emily/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A complete work of fiction based on the Thalidomide birth defect horrors of the 50's and early 60's.

      Delete
  10. Yes, I can only echo and have no nitpics. This is a beautifully written piece, imaginative and heartbreaking. I thought this prompt very difficult, but so far it has prompted some gorgeous writing.
    Bravo, Rochelle
    Lindaura
    Thank you for your swift comment on mine, but for those who have not seen mine it is here:
    http://fictionvictimtoo.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  11. Really really sad this one, but still beautifully done.
    http://castelsarrasin.wordpress.com/2012/06/07/just-chillin-friday-fictioneers-june-2012/

    ReplyDelete
  12. That's really beautiful, Rochelle. I realise its a story, but it rings with veracity in your telling.
    I actually don't like doing this, but here's mine: http://repuestodelatabla.wordpress.com/2012/06/07/friday-fictioneer-100-word-story-airship/

    ReplyDelete
  13. Beautiful story! Thanks for stopping by to read mine and leave a comment, it is here in case others would like to read.http://oldentimes.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/june-8-friday-fictioneers-just-take-me-home/

    ReplyDelete
  14. I was born in '54. Thank the Lord my mother's religion didn't allow for birth control, or there but for the grace of God go I. Great job.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I'm entering another comment just to try and figure out why my previous comment showed without my name and with strange block kerning. Your story was good enough to get two comments anyway!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I like Leslie's attitude. People could learn a thing or two from her. Good story!

    http://authorbrandonscott.wordpress.com/2012/06/07/the-ogre/

    ReplyDelete
  17. I remember being at a rodeo in Redding, CA, when I was very small, it must have been about 1949-50. There was a woman sitting in front of us who had no arms; her hands came out of her shoulders. She was wearing western garb and cowboy hat. She terrified me but I couldn't take my eyes off her. That was the reaction of a 5 year old; now I think how brave she must have been to face up to fright and ridicule.

    ReplyDelete
  18. very moving. great story.

    http://karmicdiva.wordpress.com/2012/06/07/friday-fictioneers-68-via-madison-woods/

    ReplyDelete
  19. A beautiful story, loved it! I remember well seeing children afflicted by that horrible drug and being thankful that my Mom suffered 9 mod of morning sickness without it!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Very emotional. Sounds like a true story, though I'm thinking it's fictional.

    Mine's here: http://logo-ligi.com/2012/06/08/radiant-flight/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy that it rings true. I remember the seeing the images of those poor Thalidomide babies in the 60's in Life magazine. Other than the truth of history it's a work of fiction.

      Delete
  21. Heartbreaking, but beautiful. You really show the narrator's love for her sister.
    I'm over here:
    http://elmowrites.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/friday-fiction-blimps-and-balloons/

    ReplyDelete
  22. That was very touching. I like the image of the sequins in the ashes. Here's mine:

    http://glossarch.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/off-the-leash-friday-fictioneers/

    ReplyDelete
  23. Wow. A surprise ending that fits perfectly with what went before, and a very touching story.

    My story - http://newpillowbook.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/friday-fictioneers-the-view-from-2112/

    ReplyDelete
  24. nice touch with adding sequins to the ashes. Very sad but well done.

    Here is mine http://yaralwrites.com/

    ReplyDelete
  25. Very nice downward swoop of emotional pain, then uplift at the end with her freedom. I knew the sister of a friend who had a fingerless hand, maybe from the same drug. So sad but sometimes pain can lead to strength.
    cheers,
    Laura

    ReplyDelete
  26. Oops, forgot to post my blog tag. Cheers, Laura
    http://www.westcoastwriters.blogspot.com/2012/06/friday-fictioneers-above-clouds.html

    ReplyDelete
  27. The voice is authentic and the strength and courage of all involved clearly communicated. And to think, manufacturers of chemicals are still demanding the freedom to regulate themselves and complicit legislators give them the freedom to rush drugs to market. Shame!

    Thanks for your kind words about my two sentence story, which others might want to visit at http://scottcheck.blogspot.com/2012/06/heist.html

    ReplyDelete
  28. Exactly the sort of thing that you can just imagine thinking and observing when you have a difficult thing to do like spreading someone's ashes. Very nicely done :-)

    ReplyDelete
  29. Wow, so many powerful themes packed in this story, and it seems so authentic. Great writing! Thanks for reading and commenting on my story.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Dear Rochelle,

    This was beautiful, sad and uplifting all at once. The sequins fall and we fall with them, carried along by the gravity of your storytelling. I really enjoyed this.

    Aloha,

    Doug

    (I thank you for visiting mine. This link is for fellow travelers.

    http://ironwoodwind.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/joining-a-murmuration-or-bud-cowarts-view/

    ReplyDelete
  31. Beautiful! Gorgeous...I really enjoyed this read. So inspirational. I love it!

    Mine at wwwfictionvictimblogsite.com

    ReplyDelete
  32. Quite a sad tale, but not maudlin, and ending on an uplifting, celebratory note. Very nicely done.

    Here's my entry:
    http://themasterofhisdomain.com/2012/06/09/no-more-shop-talk-100-word-flash-fiction-comic/

    ReplyDelete
  33. You have a gift of delivering disturbing stories in such a way that they don't feel sad or disturbing at all sometimes, Rochelle. I'm glad the sister was able to scatter her ashes with the sequins. For a fiction story, it sure elicited some strong emotions!

    ReplyDelete
  34. I'll have to agree with Madison. When looking at the facts, it is a sad story. However, I didn't feel sad when reading it and the ending was uplifting. This is my favorite for the week.

    thanks for reading & commenting on mine. Here's the link for others http://russellgayer.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete